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are facing now a possible theory of stearate using chemical weapons. they should've been abolished five or 10 years ago if the treaty had been enforced. so it seems to me, go for abolition of these weapons with good, thorough verification. i worked with inf despite the fact that two or three years before we got it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to sa
of judge paul william grimm of maryland to be a u.s. district judge for the district of maryland. i'm very proud of the process that senator mikulski has instituted for us making recommendations to the president to fill judicial appointments. i believe that under this process, we have reached to get the very best to recommend to the president and then to our colleagues for confirmation, and judge grimm clearly falls within this line. the senate judiciary committee favorably reported judge grimm's nomination by voice vote on june 7 of this year. judge grimm was nominated to fill the vacancy in maryland that was created when u.s. district judge benson e.laig took senior status in june. judge grimm brings a wealth of experience to this position. early in his career, he served in the military in the judge advocate corps handling commercial litigation in private practice and served as assistant attorney general of maryland. he also sat as a federal magistrate judge in maryland for 15 years. judge grimm was born in japan and received his undergraduate degree from the university of california in
, mobile banking. a whole a ray of services that we can now deliver because we are connected using this frontier technology. and that is such a powerful, powerful thing. it will have legs for the next 20 years, not to mention everything else that my friend talks about in his book on abundance, but it creates so many possibilities. >> who is the it coming prosperity written for? >> well, you know, it's written for the folks watching the show. and it's written for general audience in the united states but globally. i start in the u.s., i and in the u.s.. i feel as though the story is particularly needed in the united states. i don't believe that people in pakistan or china need to hear this because the seat. even in pakistan has really struggled with so much potential. i think it is the next greatest store, the next global opportunity and the resources we wouldn't tell people that because they would be investing heavily and the dividends with other people but it's just on the cusp of happening. really exciting. and so, it's frequent in this country. and it's for anybody that believes
enough time discussing ways to help them assimilate into civilian life. as the son of a u.s. air force veteran who spent 31 years in the air force, i'm acutely aware, as coul kay is, that it t just those that wear the uniform that serve, but their families as well. many returning vets and their families encounter a whole range of social and economic hardships that can be hard to overcome. most notably, the unemployment rate among our returning vets from afghanistan and iraq is significantly higher than for the general population, something i know kay has worked on extensively. she's also worked to get our veterans the medical assistance, the job training and the financial support they need. indeed, i don't know of any senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and
a city transit system where you don't have adequate capacity and passengers to use that facility, the same thing holds true anymore with passenger service. when i heard president obama and this administration, beginning to promote high speed rail, unfortunately most of the money, the $10 billion, does not go for high-speed rail. they chose instead to support almost 150 projects and that number is growing and a lot of that money has been left behind. in fact, most of the money that has been read dedicated to high speed rail has been sent back by states including my state, the state of florida, we had to switch a proposal for high-speed rail, the actual speed was 84 miles an hour. 84 miles for one hour transit the distance of the proposed link in central florida, that is not high speed. high speed -- by our definition, 110 miles per hour average. that doesn't mean the train gets up to 110, 150, 116 miles for some stretch. we are talking about the average speed. we are talking about a switch in ohio, looking at 39 miles to 58 miles an hour. that money was turned back. there was a si
and friend so i decided to use my time at sea to read a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules byrnes of around the world in 80 days first published in the newspaper serial in 1872. when i wasn't on watch or otherwise busy on on the ship i slowly made my way to the book. by french was good enough to my surprise but i actually enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated its period details especially the nature of the protagonists they englishman racing around the world. and has remarked offhandedly travel services at could take a person round the globe in a period of 80 days. prove that he challenged him and he is off. that 80 day measure was only conceivable by the late 19th century and the age of sales getting sails getting around the world have taken months or even years. the speed of my sailing ship would have -- it was the invention of steam power but the creation of regimented european empires around the globe, the opening of the suez canal and the emergence of commercial travel services that together made it just possible by the 18 70's t
. this is about an hour 20. >> good evening, everyone and thanks for being here. i am very excited to be with my u.s. best friend, eboo patel. i've had a wonderful time reading this book, and am very excited about having this conversation with him and then drawing you into that conversation. one of the delights about his book is his disclosing something of his own spiritual practice, particularly during the holy season of ramadan. he had many when he said that prior to entering the day he would get up, have a small breakfast, and then have a time with -- [inaudible] one of my favorite poets. and i thought it was really wonderful if we all could have kind of a moment of censuring around eboo reading one of his favorite poems. how does that sound? >> all right. thank you for the invitation to thank you all for being here. so, this is a poem that actually first heard where rumi is buried in turkey. come, come whoever you are. wanderer, worshiper, lover of reading but it doesn't matter. house is not a caravan of despair. no, even if you broken your vows, a thousand times. come yet again, come, come. a c
finished reading it. and the only word that came to my mind, and i have to confess, i never used this word, as i was a little bit uncertain, magisterial. the scope, dips, authority of the book was just really pretty staggering in terms of what your government. a lot of wonderful topics that people like me resonate to. net 1951, questions about derivatives, all sorts of questions and issues that about class stiegel. pretty interesting in terms of the depth and the capability of thinking about those issues. it turns out there should be careful using the word magisterial because i had to look it up. it means both authoritative and pedantic, don't mean it in that sense. >> i would like to start. often multinational corporations populated by the states and all depends on many states to see it , see to it that these things done. the american states have played an exceptional role in the creation of elite global capitalism and coordinating its management as well as restructuring other states to these ends. so i think it gives me a little frantic think a little bit of a what you've done your, and
the us, domestic and foreign: abortion, africa, arms control, weapons systems, taxation, regulatory policy. he was doing this all by himself. but we as scholars, most of us focus narrowly on a single area that we specialize in. and so the andersons and i really needed each other for this story. they could do the domestic and economic, and i could focus more on the foreign-policy side, and then we did joint parts together. so there's a lot of luck that happened at every turn with this book. and--and they also had the confidence of mrs. reagan. c-span: but is it a surprise to you that if you hadn't asked mrs. reagan to s--to--to get into this, that that box would have never--maybe never been looked at for a long time? >> guest: that's the beginning of the story, if i had not asked for it, and--but the--i think there are other things as well. most scholars who look at big outcomes in world history, especially in t--in the us context, tend to look at the diplomatic record, at the official diplomatic record, at government documents. what's interesting about this book is that there's not
for joining us here in booktv for a few minutes. >> my pleasure, thank you so much. >> next, from the 12 annual national book festival, elizabeth dowling taylor presents her book, "a slave in the white house: paul jennings and the madisons." it's about 45 minutes. >> good afternoon. first i am a first time author, and i'm thrilled to be here. [applause] this was a true labor of love. i researched my topic for three years and spent a year-plus writing it. it is hummabling and gratifying to see it so well received, and to be following walter isakson, robert caro, and tony. [applause] i came to develop a strong interest in paul jennings when i was director of education at james madison's month peelier in virginia. i was familiar with jennings' memoir considered by the white house historical association to be the first memoir of life in the white house. it was titled "a colored man's rem innocences of james madison," and as the title implies, it's really more about the so-called great man than it was about the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements
the rest of us. >> guest: you know, that was when he was 15 or 16 years old. and you can see some of those characteristics today in his presidency. there are a lot of reasons for that detachment. part of it has to do with hawaii. he was a native hawaiian and you just keep cool. no matter what else is going on. he had not come ridership with his buddies. best of all, you know, just being cool. it was part of his formative years. he has always had that nature. another aspect is more developed and related, i would say, or politics, which is in this country and all of its racial dynamics and explosiveness, a black person was discussed as being very cool. >> host: how much pot smoking did the president do? >> guest: well, there aren't are particulars. you know, the whole notion of bill clinton saying that he never inhaled -- well when jay leno asked the president about it, you know, without going overboard -- my book documented thoroughly. that is what they did. you know, they had a thing called total absorption, but not only did you inhale, but everything in the car as you were smoking it. the
have a corporation which is me and linda, so that has funds that i can use for all of this stuff. and i do spend, you know, why do it if you're not going to do it thoroughly? i couldn't have done this trip without that kind of a team put together. so, you know, it's not like you get an advance and then go spend it all on vacation. a lot of it goes into the work of making the book. >> the family connections, the obama family connections, as a passive observer, my head is spinning. i don't know who is who. >> okay. that's going to be a challenge for me, to come in this book, for a couple of reasons. one, it's a fairly complicated family web. and the second reason, which is unavoidable is that kenyan names read by readers in the united states can sound, you know, different and harder to remember who is who, et cetera. so i have to be able to deal with that, ma and that's a challenge for any writer. i get some ways i done in the past. you know, essentially what's important to me is not quoting somebody. when you write a long narrative, you're not putting together a string of quotes, this pe
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12